Don’t stress out about the upcoming winter; Skinny Mom has your workouts covered. And, the BEST news…they aren’t even scheduled workouts! We often forget just how far simply being “active” can go. Rather then burning yourself out at the gym, burn it up in the snow! With the impending snow days,  cabin fever, and energetic kids, these 3 activities will leave you trimmer.

Move over Boys, Mama has the Shovel!

The average person weighing in around 150 would burn around 200 calories per hour shoveling. Much like the rowing machine at the gym or hitting the speedbag, this gets your heart rate up without running! When we add the weight of the snow and the lifting motion, we also add strengthening to the workout. Don’t keep all the tension in your back and shoulders. With proper form (read these tips from SheKnows) and some extra curls or pulses with the shovel, you can hit your biceps too!

Curious to see how much you burned? Check out this calculator!

Photo credit: Looxcie.com

Snow Runs and Sled Pulls

Grab your kiddos for this next set of exercises. Have you ever taken a nice run on the beach? Felt the sand give way and start to heat up those calves? Well, snow has the same effect. Everyone burns about 100 calories per mile they run. The resistance of the snow will tone your legs while also burning an extra 50 cals per mile! Hiking on hills can also burn just as many calories as running on flat ground per hour. However, take intensity in account. The harder your work, the more fat and calories you will burn. Up for a serious challenge? Add snowshoes for extra resistance.

Sledding is a wonderful pastime. However, you can totally make some reindeer games out of the activity if the slopes are busy or not snowy enough! Have reindeer or snow dog races with your kids. Deck out your sleds, grab a rope and get ready to pull. This is a perfect total body workout.

Photo credit: Personal.psu.edu

Snowball Fight

Running around in the snow already counts as cardio. But, you can treat the snowballs as weights! Digging, packing and throwing the snowballs all count as upper-body exercises. The deeper you dig, the harder you pack and the faster your throw tremendously increases the workout’s impact.

The same goes for building snowmen and snow sculptures. Go big! Have snow rolling contests to keep the heart rate and interest up for the young kids. Try your hardest to make the largest snowball…it will only increase the resistance you face as you roll Frosty into place.